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7-27-04 Gwinnett’s Chairman Wayne Hill is in Runoff

…….. I suspect that the “bloom is off the rose” as to enjoying the job.   Many citizens could not care less about the big projects and vision.   They just want a particular project taken care of.   It is a challenge to balance those interests for an indefinite period of time.

AVOC

 

July 27, 2004

 

Gwinnett’s Wayne Hill Has Challenge to Hold Office

 

By Wendell Dawson, Editor, AVOC, Inc.

 

I think Wayne Hill has done a great job in an almost impossible position.  Wayne is well respected in Governmental circles.  He has served as Chairman of ARC and President of the Association County Commissioners of Georgia.  Some mentioned him for State office.

 

However, it is tough to build a higher political career on the County Commission foundation.   The job is tough and eventually consumes anyone who spends much time with it.

 

Wayne may win the runoff but I suspect that the “bloom is off the rose” as to enjoying the job.   Many citizens could not care less about the big projects and vision.   They just want a particular project taken care of.   It is a challenge to balance those interests for an indefinite period of time.

 

Regardless of the election outcome, AVOC wishes Wayne and Carolyn Hill well in their lives.  They are good people.


The Gwinnett Daily Post

      http://www.gwinnettdailyonline.com/GDP/archive/articleCB4FB1AE34DF4918A6A80097F3CB41EF.asp

         

 

July 25, 2004

 

Bannister, Hill vie for county chair nomination

 

 

Wayne Hill (left) won 21,272 votes and Charles Bannister (right) won 16,719 votes in Tuesday's primary election.

By Camie Young, Staff Writer

LAWRENCEVILLE — For supporters of commission Chairman Wayne Hill and challenger Charles Bannister, the choice on Aug. 10 is easy.

But what about the 30 percent of voters who chose third-place candidate Marcia Neaton?

For the Gwinnett County commission’s top spot, it’s still anybody’s game.

Although Neaton may still call for a recount of the results, a precinct-by-precinct analysis of the Republican primary shows incumbent Hill captured most of the county.

But challenger Bannister, who holds a 233-vote lead for second place, captured much of his home turf in Lilburn and Neaton secured areas of Grayson, Dacula, Collins Hill and her hometown of Duluth.

Where will the vote end up Aug. 10?
The answer may depend on who shows up at the polls.

According to political scientist Adam Stone of Georgia Perimeter College’s Lawrenceville campus, the turnout for a runoff is typically about one-third of the turnout in the previous election.

That means only about 9 percent of registered voters — 24,000 people — could decide if Hill will serve another four years.

Hill said he believes his supporters will turn out once again on Aug. 10, and he plans on working full time on the re-election campaign when he returns home from a quick vacation Monday.

Four years ago, a low voter turnout in the runoff helped secure victories for Neaton in District 1 and John Dunn in District 3 despite coming in second place in the primary.

Stone described Neaton and Bannister both as possible draws for an anti-incumbent backlash, but they have very different styles and Neaton’s votes won’t necessarily shift to the veteran House member.

While Neaton represents a localized disaffection, Bannister’s is more generalized, Stone explained.
“Local disaffection is more intense,” he said. “They also represent different generations
. Bannister is old Gwinnett. Neaton represents new Gwinnett.”

Although Neaton did not return phone calls seeking comment, supporter Mark Williams said the campaign is considering which way to steer voters.

“There’s a huge anti-Wayne sentiment in Gwinnett, but ...” Williams trailed off. Of Bannister, he said, “Many people don’t know him and the ones who do are scared of him.”

Neaton’s camp is also partly responsible for the defeat of Dunn last week, and Dunn’s campaign manager Bill McKinney was once a business partner of Bannister.

Bannister said he made a point not to get involved in any of other races in Gwinnett and did not campaign with Dunn.

Instead, he believes the runoff in District 3, as well as votes for House District 95 could help him bring in more voters from southern Gwinnett.

Another runoff for House District 98 is in Hill’s home turf — northern Gwinnett.
“I think that we will do well on the south side of the county,” Bannister said. “We probably will do better in the other areas.”

Hill said the other runoffs shouldn’t affect the chairman’s race, except to increase turnout.
“I think anytime you get more people out the better off you are,” he said.

Williams said the Neaton supporters are still likely to turn out for the vote — they just haven’t decided who they will support once they get there.
“This was a vulnerable year for Hill, but I don’t know if Bannister is the one to do it,” he said.

Hill said he hopes to turn around at least a quarter of Neaton’s vote.
“We’ve got to give it a little time and see how it goes,” he said.
“There’s a lot of unknowns, but we’ll work hard,” Hill said.


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