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12-3-04 Changing Local Landscapes - Poultry Market Growing Globally

“..in the 70’s until the mid 80’s, Oconee County’s turkey growers produced about 1 % of the national market in turkeys.  …… coop farming and changing times eventually eliminated the Oconee Turkey producers….  Turkeys were very common in the south end of the county along GA Hwy 15 and Colham Ferry Road.  Now, any turkeys in the county are wild or found dressed at Publix, Bells, or Krogers! 

AVOC

 

December 2, 2004

 

Poultry Market Going Global

 

By Wendell Dawson, Editor, AVOC, Inc.

 

This article in the Gainesville Times shows the facts and figures of how poultry consumption is growing world wide.   North Georgia has been a big poultry producer.  However, NEGA poultry farms and processing plants are feeling the pressures of population growth and its attendant tensions.

 

The information about Brazil demonstrates that America may not always dominate the global poultry market.  China may produce its own poultry in time. 

 

Nothing stays the same and nothing stays on top for ever.  I remember that in the 70’s until the mid 80’s, Oconee County’s turkey growers produced about 1 % of the national market in turkeys.  However, coop farming and changing times eliminated the Oconee Turkey producers since the eighties.   Turkeys were very common in the south end of the county along GA Hwy 15 and Colham Ferry Road.  Now, any turkeys in the county are wild or found dressed at Publix, Bells, or Krogers!  Many of those turkey fields are being converted to residences!

 

Life is full of change.  The poultry industry is demonstrating that once again in today’s “Global Economy”!


The Gainesville Times

 

December 1, 2004

 

Brazil gets into poultry market

 By Chris Hill, Poultry Watch

 

The chicken industry foresees a positive 2005, with growth in domestic consumption and exports, but may face strong competition on the world market from Brazil.

 

Chicken looks to lead the way next year in reaching a record level of total red meat and poultry consumption by Americans.

 

At 86.7 pounds, chicken will account for nearly 39 percent of the 224 pounds per capita of total red meat and poultry eaten in the United States, according to recent forecasts from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

 

Albeit a relatively small increase over the predicted 85.3 pounds per person to be consumed this year, the consumption level in 2005 would represent an increase of 13 percent since 2001.

 

In the same time frame, total red meat and poultry consumption has grown only 5 percent, with consumption of all other meats remaining relatively unchanged.

 

Exports may grow as much as 10 percent next year, partially on the hopes of renewed trade with China. China had banned imports of U.S. poultry in February because of minor outbreaks of avian influenza. The country has now declared that U.S. poultry products produced after Nov. 9 will be accepted. Total U.S. chicken exports are forecasted at roughly 5 billion pounds, the highest total since 2001. Exports will account for 14 percent of the 35 billion pounds of chicken predicted to be produced in this country next year.  Brazil is being described as the "800-pound gorilla in the kitchen" with respect to competing with the United States in chicken production and exports.

 

Poultry industry economist Paul Aho said Brazil's growth in poultry production has outpaced the United States by a ratio of 2-to-1 since 1999.

 

He made his comments at an economic forecast meeting last month in Atlanta. The Tucker-based U.S. Poultry & Egg Association sponsored the seminar. Brazil also has advantages in reduced production costs in both feed and labor. In 20 years, Aho said, Brazil's poultry industry has grown by 500 percent.

 

These factors are making Brazil a fierce competitor with the United States for exports to areas like Asia and Russia, the largest market for U.S. poultry exports.

 

Chris Hill is publisher and editor of Gainesville-based Poultry Times. He can be reached at 770-536-2476 or chill@poultryandeggnews.com. Originally published Wednesday, December 1, 2004


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