AVOC.info
Quick-Search:    

Advanced Search


12-13-04 Who Will Occupy Houses Coming to Former NEGA Cotton Fields and Pastures?

JACKSON COUNTY: ....mega-development calls for 2,440 housing units and 400,000 sq. ft. of commercial space on 1,320 acres known as the 4W Farm, just south of Arcade. - the project would be the largest single development in the county’s history and would add some 6,000 new residents. ……………… MADISON COUNTY: …….. 475 home subdivision could be in the works for 400.12 acres on Colbert Grove Church Road and Johnny McLeroy Road. - multi-phase project would be among the most significant residential developments in county history…... .

AVOC

.

December 13, 2004

.

Who Will Occupy Houses Coming to Former NEGA Cotton Fields and Pastures?

.

By Wendell Dawson, Editor, AVOC, Inc.

.

Mega Developments are not just coming to Oconee County.They are “popping up” all over.Most have standard themes (claims) in all of these projects:˜quality development”, “progress”, “mixed use”, “up-scale”, “high-end”, etc.

.

Over the last 35 years, Oconee and Northeast GA have experienced considerable growth.   It has also experienced several ‘housing recessions’.  During those years, projects with great “promise” became more conventional in the light of reality and time.   Many developers/builders have come and gone- not surviving the downturns.  (I can recall a couple of dozen that I dealt with).

.

Is it realistic to expect a large enough exodus from Gwinnett to support the Northeast GA housing market?   Where will the Hispanic population and lower income workers all live in of our “new utopia”?Who will pay for the infrastructure and schools?   Will there be that much commercial development in all of these areas in a reasonable period of time?

.

One wonders if anyone is counting.What market can provide buyers (or renters) for all these homes? If long-range, how will the investor pay the interest as interest rates climb along with cyclical downturns in the housing market?

.

Are governments being “sold” for zoning purposes?   What will be the reality in a few short years?

.


MainStreetNews.Com

.

December 9, 2004

.

----------

The Jackson Herald

.

2,440-home community being pitched for Arcade
.

Mega-development would be county’s largest project


A high-density housing planned community in Arcade is being pitched to area government leaders for comments by the Northeast Georgia Regional Development Center. And action on the plan could come as soon as Dec. 21 when an annexation and rezoning request is slated to go before the Quad Cities Planning Commission.


If approved as outlined, the project would be the largest single development in the county’s history and would add some 6,000 new residents.


The mega-development calls for 2,440 housing units and 400,000 sq. ft. of commercial space on 1,320 acres known as the 4W Farm, just south of Arcade. The developers, Brand Partners LP of Gwinnett County, want to annex the land into Arcade for the $ 43 million project.


Currently, the land is in unincorporated Jackson County and is designated with a “Rural Places” label on the county.s future land use plan. That designation calls for low-density development for the property. It is currently zoned A-2 in the county.


The developers reportedly want to annex into Arcade to remove the property from that low-density designation and have the city designate the land for high-density development as a Planned Community Development (PCD). The price range of the houses is said to be from the mid-$0,000 to $ 00,000 range.

.
The RDC sent out a draft of the project in late November to area governments for comment as a Development of Regional Impact (DRI). The RDC will take comments through Friday and a review of the project is slated to be completed by Dec. 23. If the DRI isn’t finished by the rezoning hearing on Dec. 21, that meeting will be postponed.

.
PROJECT OUTLINED

.
In the DRI request for comments, the project is said to include
2,215 single family detached homes, 100 attached townhouses and 125 “active adult” units. In addition, the project calls for 406,000 sq. ft. of commercial and office space facing Hwy. 129.   A golf course is also slated for the project.
The project also says that space in the commercial district would be dedicated for a new Arcade City Hall.    The time frame for completing the project is said to be 10-20 years.

.
The proposal estimates that the housing will accommodate approximately 6,000 new residents and generate $ 56,000 in annual property taxes and $ .75 million in sales taxes. The total build-out value of the project is estimated to be $ 43 million.


IMPACTS
The impact of the project on various infrastructure is also outlined in the DRI report
. Peak hour traffic volume is estimated to be 2,450 trips affecting mostly Hwy. 129 and Holiday Cemetery Road.
The development will also create about
600,000 gallons per day of wastewater that will be treated with an on-site wastewater treatment plant.The treated effluent will be used for golf course irrigation.

.
The DRI also states that the project will need 600,000 gallons per day of treated water and that it would
have an on-site water system. However, the need for water for the project has been a hot topic in recent weeks between the City of Arcade and the Jackson County Water and Sewerage Authority.
The development is also projected to create 1,849 tons of solid waste per year.

.
SCHOOLS
Estimates for the project indicate that it will have 1,000 school-aged children. The DRI says that the long-term phasing of the project “should allow for increased coordination between the board of education and the local government to mitigate congestion issues that may arise.”


The Madison County Journal

.

475-home subdivision in the works?

.
Major residential development proposed for Colbert Grove Church Road, Johnny McElroy Road
A 475-home subdivision could be in the works for 400.12 acres on Colbert Grove Church Road and Johnny McLeroy Road.

.
If approved, the multi-phase project would be among the most significant residential developments in county history.

.
I dare to say this would be the biggest (subdivision) we’ve had,” said zoning administrator Kim Butler, noting that the largest subdivision approved in her time as administrator is 88 lots.

.
Butler filed a required Development of Regional Impact (DRI) form with the Georgia Department of Community Affairs Tuesday for the proposed residential development.
(The form can be viewed online at www.georgiaplanning.com/ Click on DRI online application, then click on “submissions”) DRI projects “are large-scale developments that are likely to have effects outside of the local government jurisdiction.” In ‘non-metropolitan regions’ housing developments of 125 new lots or units must include a DRI plan from the local government.

.
The DRI form filed Tuesday lists Starke V. Hudson as the developer.
The property owner is listed as Coleman Whitehead. The completion date is noted as 2010.

.
Whitehead, who is selling the land to Hudson, said that Hudson is “a very good developer,” with a reputation for quality work.
Whitehead said there will be “no low-end stuff here, just medium and up,” adding that he owns other property near the development and that he wouldn’t want to do anything that would de-value the neighboring land. (Hudson could not be reached as of press time.)

.
A rezoning request for the subdivision is on the December planning commission agenda. But the DRI approval is not expected before this month’s public hearings. So Butler said the proposal is expected to go before county leaders for an actual vote in January, when three new commissioners will take their seats at the BOC table. Butler said the public can comment on the proposal in December, though she said the applicant has told her that he doesn’t plan to attend the December meetings.

.
Notably, the proposed subdivision does not conform to the county’s current land use map. It is neither in the county’s “high density” area nor its “medium density” zone.


12-11-04 Commerce Considers 500 Residences ‘mixed-use’ Development


The Commerce News


December 8, 2004                       COLUMN

.

New Project Will Set A Precedent For Development
.

By Mark Beardsley

.

It is expected that the Commerce City Council will approve rezoning of 276 acres in the triangle where old U.S. 441 and the 441 bypass meet. The property, proposed as a ‘mixed-use’ development containing commercial property and 500 residences,was to have been rezoned to C-2, then parts would be re-zoned for residential use once the details were worked out.

.
The rezoning has been postponed a month, but there will be both commercial and residential tracts.
The developer wants 253 lots a hair bigger than a quarter acre for single-family houses and to build 250 units of townhouses. To this point, the city has opposed houses on such small lots and townhouses in general. For example, it rejected a proposal for the White Hill School Road just recently that would have put 114 houses on small lots in order to preserve open space, opting to allow the developer standard R-1 lots of 32,500 square feet - three-quarter-acre lots.

.
The Commerce Planning Commission has been vigilant - too much so, some say - about rejecting developments of “starter houses,” and what it considers high-density housing over concerns of how the development will look after it is occupied and what its effect will be on the school system.

.
Now comes a proposal by one of the Atlanta area’s top developers with something Commerce needs and its officials covet - a significant commercial development. To get that, however, the city must accept the very types of housing it has heretofore shunned……..

.

What officials struggle with is how to reduce the number of houses and townhouses without scaring the developer off. Can they reduce the number by half or a third?

.
Another concern is the commercial sector, which fronts on the bypass from Georgia 326 south. City officials would like to see restaurants, chain stores, boutiques and other stores, plus the big-box anchor of a grocery store.   They do not want development comprising convenience stores, pawn shops, check-cashing businesses and the like that make Buford Highway in Atlanta look sleazy.   How can they protect against that?.........


Quick-Search: