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1-17-05 Civil Rights Attorney Donald Hollowell Was a Professional

Donald Hollowell is the kind of leader that deserves more credit than that of colorful but less effective figures like Jesse Jackson.   Afro-Americans would be wise to emulate and use Donald Hollowell, Constance Mobley, Hamilton Holmes, Horace Ward and Charlayne Hunter as genuine role models.   They were and are the “real thing”.

AVOC

 

January 17, 2005

 

Donald Hollowell Was a Professional

 

By Wendell Dawson, Editor, AVOC, Inc.

 

The Fulton Daily Report (GA Lawyers Newspaper), in its December 29, 2004, issue reported on the death on December 27, 2004, of Civil Rights Champion Donald Hollowell.  Other papers carried lengthy and positive stories on Mr. Hollowell.

 

 

On this anniversary date of the birth of Martin Luther King, JR., it is fitting that we acknowledge such pioneers of the Civil Rights Movement.  Some did not get the national press coverage but quietly went about their pursuits.  Donald Hollowell was such a person.   The article described his treatment as an attorney in segregated Georgia of the 40’s and 50’s.  Even some judges were disrespectful.

 

In her book, “In My Place” [ Charlayne Hunter Gault  (Farrar Straus & Giroux, 1992;Reprint in Paperback by Vintage Books, 1993) ]  , Charlayne Hunter-Gault, describes how Hollowell helped her and Hamilton Holmes integrate the University of Georgia in 1961.  One recent article quoted her as saying, “…Martin Luther King was our leader and Donald Hollowell was our lawyer..”

 

As a student at the University of Georgia in 1961, I attended the Federal Trial in Athens to integrate the University of Georgia.   I was present the day that Mr. Hollowell cross-examined University of Georgia President Aderhold.  I remember questions about why Horace Ward was not accepted at the UGA law school in the 50’s.  (The Horace Ward story was a news story on the radio for several years.)  Horace Ward was not admitted and wound up going to Northwestern Law School, I believe.  Mr. Hollowell asked President Aderhold if the University of Georgia Law School had higher standards than did Northwestern.  It was effective questioning.

 

I remember others from that trial:  Federal District Judge William A.  Bootle, a judge who was very capable and was well respected; Constance Mobley, Attorney from New York, who later became a Federal Judge; Horace Ward, a young attorney who had a lower profile role; Hollowell; Hamilton Holmes and Charlayne Hunter.  Holmes and Hunter were attractive, neatly dressed young people who were ideal applicants.   Mobley and Hollowell carried much of the Plaintiff prosecution.  I remember both of them as very professional, competent, and effective.

 

 

Donald Hollowell is the kind of leader that deserves more credit than that of colorful but less effective figures like Jesse Jackson.   Afro-Americans would be wise to emulate and use Donald Hollowell, Constance Mobley, Hamilton Holmes, Horace Ward and Charlayne Hunter as genuine role models.   They were and are the “real thing”.

 

SEE AVOC ARTICLE:  05/19/02 - EYEWITNESS TO HISTORY: Integration of UGA 1960-1961


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