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7-18-05 Death of Opponent of Placement of “Ten Commandments” in Public Buildings

GAINESVILLE TIMES:  Turner's opinions "made people think," Ted Oglesby, former editorial page editor for The Times, said of the longtime columnist. ……"He was controversial, but he was always in our conversations very polite, learned and dedicated to his beliefs," Oglesby said. ………

AVOC

 

July 17, 2005

 

Death of Opponent of Placement of “Ten Commandments”  in Public Buildings

 

By Wendell Dawson, Editor, AVOC, Inc.

 

I never met Rev. Bo Turner or heard him speak.  I have read some of his Letters chiding local officials for “playing politics” with the Ten Commandments.  He is the person who sued and won in the Habersham Courthouse case.

 

While he was a religious person and a long-time minister, his position was in favor of separation of  church and state.   This position was in contrast to that of many area citizens.

 

I do not agree with all of his positions but I do respect his courage and efforts in what he believed.  He was more right on the law than most of us who want to display the Ten Commandments.  It is ironic that his death occurred shortly after the Supreme Court ruled in favor of his position in two Kentucky Courthouses.

 

People like Bo Turner make us think and helps hold back the “herd instinct”.    His many civic and church efforts very graphically demonstrate his basic goodness and wish to do good for humanity.  Many of us could take pointers from that kind of service.

 


The Gainesville Times

http://www.gainesvilletimes.com/news/stories/20050717/localnews/123186.shtml

 

July 17, 2005

 

Outspoken minister Bo Turner dies at 72

By MATT STEWART and DAVID BRANDT

The Rev. Charles "Bo" Turner, a minister known around North Georgia for his philanthropy and outspoken political beliefs, died Saturday at his home. He was 72.

He served as a pastor at Tallulah Falls Baptist Church, where he celebrated his 25-year anniversary with the congregation in March.

But Turner's life went beyond the walls of the church. He taught special education at Habersham Central High School and worked as a substance abuse counselor for state prisoners in Jefferson.

He was also the co-founder of the Northeast Georgia Habitat for Humanity, and worked with the group's founder, Millard Fuller, and former President Jimmy Carter in the foundation's early years. He served on Clarkesville's city council and as mayor from 1979-88. …..

……. Turner held a strong belief opposing the mix of politics and religion. He served as president of the Americans United for Separation of Church and State of Georgia.

He was an opponent of the placement of the Ten Commandments display in Habersham County. For two years, Turner battled the county over the issue with support from the American Civil Liberties Union, and eventually won.

Turner would later say, "I feel very strongly that church and government must be separated. We don't need them telling us what or how or when to worship."

Turner's opinions "made people think," Ted Oglesby, former editorial page editor for The Times, said of the longtime columnist.

"He was controversial, but he was always in our conversations very polite, learned and dedicated to his beliefs," Oglesby said. ………

A military veteran and graduate of Piedmont College, he is survived by his wife, Emma, three sons and seven grandchildren. ……

Also, SEE:  AccessNorthGA.Com

 

http://www.accessnorthga.com/news/hall/newfullstory.asp?ID=94248


The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

http://www.ajc.com/friday/content/epaper/editions/friday/opinion_244c9dfc86a900390005.html

 

July 1, 2005                      LETTERS

Many moral, ethical people are atheists

The Rev. BO TURNER
Turner, of Clarkesville, is pastor of Tallulah Falls Baptist Church

Sadie Fields is simply wrong in saying morality is derived from religion ("Can't have morality without religion," Letters, June 28).

Some of the most moral and ethical people I know are atheists. Fields uses the religious right's mantra "acknowledgment of God" to justify putting copies of the Ten Commandments on public property.

God is acknowledged with our lives, not with our lips.


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