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12-7-05 Pearl Harbor Day Is Remembered as Twin Towers Fades

Look at the progress of Japan- our hated enemy for decades and our ally and friend for years now.   Things do change.   Critics of our nation should pause and think about the events of Pearl Harbor and 9-11.   Events change lives and nations.   Sadly, one wonders if future history records will describe us as the “Greatest Generation”.

AVOC

 

December 7, 2005

 

Pearl Harbor Day Is Remembered as Twin Towers Fades

 

By Wendell Dawson, Editor, AVOC, Inc.

 

I was born before Pearl Harbor Day, December 7, 1941.  I was too young to remember it but I grew up with it.  Pearl Harbor was a term of somberness and respect.   It has been only 64 years but it has faded from the public memory as the members of the “Greatest Generation” pass on.

 

On December 7, 1961, I remember announcing that it was 20th anniversary of Pearl Harbor Day when I entered my UGA ROTC class.  My instructor, Col Farrell, was a veteran of the war and sighed and commented, “…Gosh, has it been that long?!”

 

All of us remember stories about Pearl Harbor- where we were, survivor stories, Roosevelt’s “Day of Infamy” speech, Jeanette Rankin’s sole vote against the war and others.

 

One wonders if our nation has not only lost its consciousness of Pearl Harbor Day but also memory and inspiration from the Twin Towers Attacks of September 11, 2001.   That has been only four short years!

 

While 64 years is a long time in one’s personal life, it is only a mini-second in the chronicles of history.  Look at the progress of Japan- our hated enemy for decades and our ally and friend for years now.   Things do change.   Critics of our nation should pause and think about the event of Pearl Harbor and 9-11.   Events change lives and nations.   Sadly, one wonders if future history records will describe us as the “Greatest Generation”.


 

The Augusta Chronicle

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/120705/edi_5895708.shtml

 

December 7, 2005                           EDITORIAL

 

A tale of two tragedies

 

We remember Pearl Harbor, but already forgetting 9-11

 

Sixty-four years ago today, the Japanese Imperial Navy's air force attacked Pearl Harbor with unexpected swiftness and stunning effectiveness - killing nearly 2,400 Americans and destroying or damaging much of the U.S. Navy's fleet. including the battleship U.S.S. Arizona with 1,102 crewmen aboard.

 

Despite the crippling military blow, Japan's unprecedented, unprovoked "Day of Infamy" attack, as declared by President Franklin Roosevelt, was the defining event for the 1940s' generation of Americans. It brought the United States into World War II.

 

"Remember Pearl Harbor" became the war's quintessential battle cry in books and song as the American people steeled themselves for a long and costly war in terms of lives and treasure. Four years of grueling warfare and more than 1 million U.S. casualties never shook the resolve.

 

Contrast that World War II home-front toughness with many civilians' lack of resolve in today's war against al-Qaida and its Jihadist terrorist allies. Never mind that Islamic fascists' war on the West dates back to the 1983 suicide bomb attack on Marine headquarters in Lebanon that killed 241 U.S. military personnel - or that Osama bin Laden officially declared war on the American people in his 1996 fatwa.

 

Many Americans never took those events seriously - not even after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on New York's World Trade Center and the Pentagon that took nearly 3,000 lives - more than at Pearl Harbor.

 

That was the defining event for this generation of Americans. Yet, except for the courageous young men and women carrying the fight in Afghanistan and Iraq, there seems little commitment to win this war - or even to protect the nation from further attacks.

 

The bipartisan 9-11 Commission has taken Washington to task for not following up on many of its security recommendations. Commission co-chairman Lee Hamilton says it's not a matter of if, but when, another 9-11 will take place on U.S. soil.

 

He could well be right. Many Americans don't take the war on terrorists seriously. They see 9-11 as a criminal act, not an act of war. The farther 9-11 recedes into the past, the more vulnerable our nation becomes to another "surprise" attack. If today's generations remember the Twin Towers like their parents and grandparents remember Pearl Harbor, America's present and future would be a lot more secure.


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