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3-9-06 Basketball & Memories of Bogart (Oconee County) Georgia – “Times Gone By”

JACK HOGAN: Stories about our life, relatives and others should be passed on.  We owe it to future generations to pass on stories about our families, hopes, dreams, failures, and our faith. So take time to listen to an older person. Record it in writing or on tape and pass it on to those in your family and others.


Occasionally I try to write about my experiences in the little town of Bogart, Georgia, schools, and my relatives…..

AVOC

 

March 5, 2006

 

Basketball & Memories of Bogart

 

By Wendell Dawson

 

Like many of us over 60 Jack Hogan reminisces from time to time about his growing up in Bogart, Oconee County, Georgia.

 

The Hogan brothers, Jack, Donald and Larry, all were great high school basketball players.  Jack graduated from Bogart in 1954 before my High School days.  My daddy, like other Oconee Countians of the 40’s and 50’s loved high school basketball.  As a young boy, I remember going to many games at the Old Watkinsville Gym and the old Bogart Gym.  Watkinsville and Bogart were big rivals.

 

In 1956, the two schools were consolidated into Oconee County High School on Mars Hill Road.  I was in the first Junior Class; Donald Hogan was in the first Senior Class; Larry Hogan was in the first Sophomore Class.  We three had some classes together and went to UGA about the same time.  Donald and I married cousins and have been in frequent contact since the 50’s.

 

Through Donald, the Internet, funerals and common background, Jack and I maintain email contact.  He is a good writer and helps preserve a rich part of our culture and life history.

 

It is always enjoyable to commiserate with contemporaries about the Oconee County and the Georgia of the 40’s and 50’s.   In those days, we developed lifetime bonds and friendships that are not easily found in today’s more transit society.

 

SEE:

4-15-05 Small Towns - Bogart and Oconee County in the 40’s and 50’s

8-19-05 'Ghosts of Bogart' - Presented at 2004 Bogart Reunion

11-18-05 “You Can Go Home Again”- Memories of Bogart and Rural Oconee

12-24-05 Memory Lane - Lewis Grizzard, UGA, GA 316 and more….


2-27-06 I love sports (Since Bogart Days) by Jack Hogan

 

Jack Hogan on Basketball

 

February 27, 2006

 

I Love Sports

 

By Jack Hogan (BOHS Class of 54)

 

I have always loved the game of basketball, especially from the time that Mr. R.W. (Mutt) Stephens took us Bogart six graders to play the Athens YMCA back in 1948.  Since we had never played any organized sports before, we got beat about a zillion to six. After that game, Dad made a home made backboard and hung a home made goal on the tree beside the church. I practiced and practiced and had fun playing in high school and four years in college. My college coach felt that varsity basketball was another class and that we would learn from it more about life than any other class. After all these years, I would have to say he was probably right, depending upon how you look at life. 

 

 R. W. Mutt Stephens, Bogart Coach and Teacher

 

Old Bogart Gym

 

My wife?... well, although she didn't play basketball in high school, it seems to be her favorite sport. At least she pretended as though she did when we dated. During our younger years of marriage, she probably felt I spent a little too much time playing and watching basketball, and she may have been right.  I played in the Chattanooga Industrial League for several years, which consisted mostly of old tired college players. So whenever I find some redeeming quality in a sporting event, I am quick to point it out to her. Such an event occurred this past week.

 

Jason McElwain, a senior at Athena High School in New York, got in the last basketball game of the regular season with four minutes remaining in the game.  What makes this so special is that Jason MacElwain, 5' 6", is autistic and he was the team manager. His normal place was at the end of the bench, in a white shirt and tie, handing water and towels to players as they came off the court. 

 

As you may have recently watched on ESPN, this night would be different for Jason. His love for basketball caused the head coach to allow Jason to dress for the game. The student section had been notified that he would dress, so they came to the game prepared with pictures of Jason on popsicle sticks. 

 

With four minutes remaining in the game, the coach stood up off the bench and motioned for Jason to enter the game. No sooner than he motioned to him, Jason sprang to his feet and was at the scorers table checking in. No one could have dreamed what would happen next.

Jason proceeded to hit six three-pointers (tying a school record) and hit a two-pointer that was almost a three-pointer, but his toe was on the line. Twenty points in four minutes!  As Jason hit his sixth three-pointer as time was running out, the fans and the players all ran onto the court, hoisted him up on their shoulders and carried him off the court. 

 

What a scene!  From the tears flowing down the coach's face, to the support of his fellow students, and to the reaction of his teammates, we had modeled before us the best of mankind. The basketball game itself took a back seat to the human interest in a young boy with autism.

 

When interviewed at the end of the game, Jason, beaming with pride, simply said, "I was as hot as a pistol!"  Way to go Jason!  And way to go Athena High! 

 

Now, how can you not love sports, especially basketball and baseball, two games invented in America? They go right along with American apple pie............. Think about it.


Jack Hogan on Libraries-Memories.1.9.06

 

January 9, 2006

 

"Every time an old person dies a library closes”

 

By Jack Hogan (BOHS Class of 54)

 

I recently read this quote, "Every time an old person dies a library closes”.

 

Stories about our life, relatives and others should be passed on.  We owe it to future generations to pass on stories about our families, hopes, dreams, failures, and our faith. So take time to listen to an older person. Record it in writing or on tape and pass it on to those in your family and others.


Occasionally I try to write about my experiences in the little town of Bogart, Georgia, schools, and my relatives. These writings are for my sons, their sons and their children for generations to come. They include stories, lessons, failures, and wins that have made up my life. It takes some effort, but oh how I wish my parents and their parents had done such for me.

 

In a world that has lost its anchors, we need roots. Make sure your anchor withstands the storm.

 

Jack


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