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11-7-07 A tad early to declare Hillary Clinton as the winner of the Presidency

The election is a year away. Hillary will have many opportunities to prove herself to the American Voter. Some voters, reports notwithstanding, have not jelled in their position. It will be interesting to watch events unfold.

AVOC

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November 4, 2007

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A tad early to declare Hillary Clinton as the winner of the Presidency

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By Wendell Dawson, Editor, AVOC, Inc

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The National Media often operates on a “herd” or “mob” mentality in publicizing and supporting candidates and issues.   Reports of recent weeks would have us believe that Hillary Clinton’s nomination and election to the Presidency are inevitable.

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Hillary Clinton may become President.However, it is too early to declare her the victor.     History reminds us how Dewey would beat Truman, Reagan could not win, Bush could not win a second term.    Recent years saw much of the Media anointing Howard Dean as the Democratic Nominee in 2004.   Much of the same media then started preparing us for a John Kerry Inauguration!         And now Hillary Clinton ……

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Some assume Hillary Clinton is already our “next President” – Some are Scared….

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Hillary Clinton is an enigma.   She has been able to mask her true feelings and opinions on many issues.In some ways, she is preferable to the other Democrat Candidates.   She has high negatives with polls showing that over 50% of voters would not vote for her.   That may be a problem when she is the nominee and the Republicans have one candidate.   She cannot continue to run “against George Bush”.    There will be many occasions for the public to see her more transparently.

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The media cannot always hide “meanness” or equivocation.   The public was able to size up John Kerry and he failed the test…Apologists “blame” the Swift Boat Veterans.   That demonstrates their tunnel vision.   Many of us believed the Swift Boat Veterans and do not need to be told the “truth” by TIME, NEWSWEEK, NEW YORK TIMES, ABC ETC.

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The election is a year away.   Hillary will have many opportunities to prove herself to the American Voter.   Some voters, reports notwithstanding, have not jelled in their position.   It will be interesting to watch events unfold.


11-2-07 Bush 41 not sure about Hillary Clinton Nomination

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TIME - The Page by Mark Halperin|

http://thepage.time.com/bush-41-backs-away-from-clinton/

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November 02, 2007

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Bush 41 Backs Away From Clinton

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George H.W. Bush on FOX News Sunday’s “American Leaders” series with Chris Wallace

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“Well, look, if she’s the nominee, I obviously will be for her opponent.  I thought a few weeks ago that she was almost a ‘gimme’, as we say in golf, for the nomination.  I’m not sure I feel that way now. Well, there seems to be more kind of internal — in her own party there seems to be more willingness to take her on and to argue about stuff.  But she’s a formidable opponent and she’s done very well, in my view.  Now would I be for her?  No.”

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“I’m not sure that — you know, again, I want to be on record as just saying I don’t necessarily believe Hillary is going to win the primary, to say nothing of the general election.  But the American people have a way of sorting these things out.  And they go to caucuses or go to the primaries and just work, grind your way up the — to whatever lies ahead, and that’s what’s happened.  There hasn’t been any anointing in the process.”

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11-1-07 Hillary Clinton Campaign in “dither” over Tim Russert and NY drivers licenses for illegals

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The Hill

http://thehill.com/leading-the-news/campaign-call-reveals-clinton-debate-concern-2007-11-01.html

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November 01, 2007

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Campaign call reveals Clinton debate concern

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By Sam Youngman

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Clinton came under withering assault in the Philadelphia debate, and some supporters on the call agreed with analysts that she stumbled.
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“I wouldn’t say she lost her cool,” one caller said. “But I would say she lost her footing.”

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The caller added that Clinton’s response to questions about records from her time in the White House that have been sealed by the National Archives “made me roll my eyes.”
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The criticisms followed Penn’s assertion that Clinton was “unflappable.” He also said criticisms from Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill.) and former Sen. John Edwards (D-N.C.) would backfire and that he was already “detecting some backlash,” particularly among female voters.
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Those female voters are saying, “Sen. Clinton needs our support now more than ever if we’re going to see this six-on-one to try to bring her down,” Penn told those on the campaign call.
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He, Mantz and several supporters hinted repeatedly on the call that Clinton was unfairly targeted by Tim Russert, debate moderator and host of NBC’s “Meet the Press.”
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“Russert made it appear that President Clinton had done something new or unusual,” Penn said, before adding that it “is, in fact, an extremely confusing situation … I think there will be further clarification.”

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While one supporter voiced his concern that the Clinton campaign is not devoting enough money and staff to Iowa, lagging behind Obama, most supporters who commented on the call expressed their displeasure with what they saw as the moderators’ focus on Clinton.
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One caller from Oklahoma City said that “the questions … were designed to incite a brawl,” and that Russert’s and Brian Williams’s moderating was “an abdication of journalistic responsibility.”
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Another said Russert “should be shot,” before quickly adding that she shouldn’t say that on a conference call.
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Penn and Mantz said they were hearing a lot of the same sentiment from other supporters, but they do not plan to engage the media or the debate’s moderators.
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Those results diverge sharply from the assessment of most analysts who watched the debate, and thought Clinton did poorly. Her campaign appeared to be in full damage-control mode Wednesday.

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11-2-07 Newt Gingrich: Hillary's Nomination Chances Just Dropped From 80 to 50 Percent

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“Her performance in that debate was so bad, on issues that matter so much, she may not be able to recover from it…

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National Review Online - The Campaign Spot

http://campaignspot.nationalreview.com/post/?q=OGI0N2FiYmJmODUyYTczNWNmMTViMjFhYzZkODRlNDM=

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November 2, 2007

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NEWT GINGRICH, HILLARY CLINTON

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Newt Gingrich: Hillary's Nomination Chances Just Dropped From 80 to 50 Percent

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Newt Gingrich called in to Sean Hannity's radio program to discuss Hillary Clinton's debate performance.

Highlights:

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“Her performance in that debate was so bad, on issues that matter so much, she may not be able to recover from itThis issue of Spitzer trying to give out driver's licenses to people at a time when your driver’s license allows you to vote — for her to trap herself into saying that creates a big wound…

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The fact that she said she’s basically sympathetic with Rangel’s trillion-dollar-tax increase — that’s going to arouse some deep opposition. The huge Democratic tax increase allowed us to win in 1994… Then, I saw in a ticker on Fox News, when Sen. Edwards said nominating her would be ‘a victory for a corruption machine’… it brings back a lot of memories of the Chinese funding scandals of 1996… It takes her winning the nomination from an 80 percent likelihood to a 50 percent. It’s even money. If she doesn’t turn this around quick, I may have to call back in and take it even lower.”

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Newt wants senators to try to get an amendment on a bill banning states from offering driver’s licenses to those who are in the country illegally.


9-5-07 Hillary Clinton at Wellesley – Youth Positions

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The New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/05/us/politics/05clinton.html?ei=5065&en=5ce3af9d7ea96d4d&ex=1189656000&partner=MYWAY&pagewanted=print

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September 5, 2007

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The Long Run

In Turmoil of ’68, Clinton Found a New Voice

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By MARK LEIBOVICH

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WASHINGTON, Sept. 4 — In September 1968, Hillary Diane Rodham, role model and student government president, was addressing Wellesley College freshmen girls — back when they were still called “girls” — about methods of protest. It was a hot topic in that overheated year of what she termed “confrontation politics from Chicago to Czechoslovakia.”

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“Dynamism is a function of change,” Ms. Rodham said in her speech. “On some campuses, change is effected through nonviolent or even violent means. Although we too have had our demonstrations, change here is usually a product of discussion in the decision-making process.”

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Her handwritten remarks — on file in the Wellesley archives — abound with abbreviations, crossed-out sentences and scrawled reinsertions, as if composed in a hurry. Yet Ms. Rodham’s words are neatly contained between tight margins. She took care to stay within the lines, even when they were moving so far and fast in 1968. While student leaders at some campuses went to the barricades, Ms. Rodham was attending teach-ins, leading panel discussions and joining steering committees. She preferred her “confrontation politics” cooler.

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“She was not an antiwar radical trying to create a mass movement,” said Ellen DuBois, who, with Ms. Rodham, was an organizer of a student strike that April. “She was very much committed to working within the political system. From a student activist perspective, there was a significant difference.”

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As the nation boiled over Vietnam, civil rights and the slayings of two charismatic leaders, Ms. Rodham was completing a sweeping intellectual, political and stylistic shift. She came to Wellesley as an 18-year-old Republican, a copy of Barry Goldwater’s right-wing treatise, “The Conscience of a Conservative,” on the shelf of her freshman dorm room. She would leave as an antiwar Democrat whose public rebuke of a Republican senator in a graduation speech won her notice in Life magazine as a voice for her generation.

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Hillary Rodham Clinton’s course was set, in large part, during the supercharged year of 1968. “There was a sense of tremendous change, internationally and here at home which impacted greatly how I thought about things,” Mrs. Clinton said in a telephone interview about that period, which encompassed the second half of her junior and first half of her senior years.

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It was a time at once disorienting and clarifying, a period that would reinforce the future senator and presidential candidate’s suspicion of “emotional politics” while stoking her frustration with what she considered the passivity of her classmates.

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Her political itinerary that year resembles a frenzied travelogue of youthful contradiction. She might have been the only 20-year-old in America who worked on the antiwar presidential campaign of Senator Eugene McCarthy in New Hampshire that winter and for the hawkish Republican congressman Melvin Laird in Washington that summer.

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She attended both the Republican National Convention in Miami (bunking at the Fontainebleu Hotel, ordering room service for the first time — cereal and a daintily wrapped peach) and the Democratic donnybrook in Chicago (smelling tear gas at Grant Park, watching a toilet fly out the window of the Hilton hotel).

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The day after the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was slain, she joined a demonstration in Post Office Square in Boston, returning to campus wearing a black armband.

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“People become experiences,” Ms. Rodham wrote about all the ferment in a Feb. 23 letter to John Peavoy, a friend from high school. She added later, “The whole society is brittle.”

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Looking back, it is easy to see that ambitious political science major in the first lady, United States senator and, now, presidential candidate she would become. She campaigned meticulously in student elections, going door to door and dorm to dorm. She wrote thank-you notes to professors who helped her.

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In the bustle of her excursions, she showed the zeal of an emerging political junkie. And, while outspoken and often blunt, Ms. Rodham was hardly a bomb-thrower. She was, then as now, dedicated to cerebral policy debates, government process and carefully calibrated positions.

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“Her opinions are mature and responsible, rather than emotional and one-sided,” Alan Schechter, a political science professor at Wellesley, wrote in a law school recommendation that year for Ms. Rodham.

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